BWSF Raleigh

When someone uses the term “Black Wall Street,” they could be thinking of any number of Black business districts across the country in communities that were segregated by law and sustainable by design.

 

Map of North Carolina with location pins on Durham, Raleigh, Charlotte, Winston-Salem, and FayettevilleAs Forward Cities embarks on an unprecedented project to understand and shift narratives around Black business ownership, Durham’s historic Black Wall Street serves as a model. Raleigh has been selected as one of five pilot communities for Forward Cities’ Black Wall Street initiative.

 

Why Raleigh?

Raleigh is the capital city of North Carolina and is the second-most populous city in North Carolina. Following the Civil War, Raleigh became a center of opportunity and advancement for Black Americans. That significance is evident today in numerous landmarks, districts, and educational and cultural institutions.Foremost are two of the nation’s leading historically Black universities: Shaw University and Saint Augustine's College. In 2024, Money Magazine ranked Raleigh #4 on its list of ‘Best Places to live in U.S’, citing, among other things, its cultural festivals such as the African-American Cultural Festival. The City of Raleigh government demonstrates a strong commitment to advancement of Black businesses through a variety of programs and initiatives - including their commitment to and support of the Black Wall Street Forward Initiative.

 

Group discussion around tables

Mel Wright headshot

Mel Wright

Raleigh Ecosystem Builder in Residence

Mel Wright is an Army veteran, a mother of a 19 year old son, the owner of 2 businesses and has also been appointed as 1 of 15 group leaders for the area community study of the Dix Edge project for the city of Raleigh. She takes pride in The Wright Village (TWV) coworking/incubator space and her tax business. A big believer in Cotivation, Mel supports collaborations and motivation between entrepreneurs.
Mel is no stranger to the entrepreneurial lifestyle. She has over 7 years of entrepreneurship. After 2.5 years of Mel’s attempt at business number 2, Beau and Beauty, a resale clothing store, she had to make a choice: lose her home or close the store. Spending tons of money to build a business she had no idea how to run, knew nothing about a target market, analytics or even the area, Mel decided to go back to school, where she attended North Carolina Central and graduated May 2020 with a Bachelor of Business Administration with a concentration in marketing. She knew that once she graduated she would be able to help other entrepreneurs along their journeys and help them avoid the same mistakes she made.

Always having the passion for helping others, she wanted to become this small business liaison. In December of 2019 she started to look for an office for her tax business and came upon the current location of TWV and knew that a coworking/incubator space would be that perfect fit. She would be able to help others and also build a village of like-minded entrepreneurs looking to collaborate, build and grow their businesses with each other.

The Wright Village is a place for entrepreneurs to come and build their business while learning and helping others along the way. Providing the resources and the accountability that one would need to become successful is what you will get by being a member of the TWV. It takes a village, ”The Wright Village.”

The Raleigh Pilots

Small Business Success Academy

The focus is on business growth through client acquisition and access to capital. The Academy will be conducted in 4 ½ day sessions with the intention of initiating the development of a network of successful Black small business owners. It’s expected that this kind of network can be the backbone for creating a reimagined Black Wall Street.

Black Wall Street Forward Directory

A comprehensive directory of Black small business owners that will be used to develop and deliver support and resources. The level of each small business will be categorized in the book by: future entrepreneur (not ready to start, startup) - 1 yr or less, early stage - 2-5 yrs, growing - 6 yrs and above.

Discover BWSF - Raleigh

Connect with us

For updates and information, connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @BlackWallStFwd.

 

To stay updated on The Black Wall Street Forward initiative and the various opportunities to get involved with the initiative, subscribe to the newsletter!

Collaborative Black leadership and innovation

 

Katrece Boyd headshot

Katrece Boyd

General Business Counselor, Small Business and Technology Development Center (SBTDC)
Bill Davis

Bill Davis

Retired, Team Nimbus of North Carolina

Culturally-rooted geographic business hub

 

Tosh Comer headshot

Tosh Comer

Coaching & Connections Manager, Thread Capital
Johnny Hackett

Johnny Hackett Jr.

CEO, Black Dollar Corp

Ally investment and partnership

 

Heather McDougall headshot

Heather McDougall

Sr Manager Strategy & Innovation, City of Raleigh
Clark Rinehart headshot

Clark Rinehart

Founder, SIVIK Communities

Talent pipeline seeded by education

 

Katie Gailes

Katie Gailes

CEO, Katie Gailes & Co.
Hanif Omar

Hanif Omar

Professor of Entrepreneurship, Shaw University

Engagement with the broader Black community

 

Mia LaMotte headshot

Mia Lamotte

CEO/Owner, LaMotte International
Ryan Ray

Ryan Ray

Founder, Triangle Entrepreneurial Leadership

Self-perpetuating funding engine

 

Corey Barbour

Corey Barbour

VP Commercial Banker, North State Bank
Reggie Jones headshot

Reggie Jones

Business Solutions Director, Carolina Small Business Development Center

Partners

We're grateful for being able to partner with the following organizations to catalyze Black-centric Entrepreneurial Ecosystems:

Truist Foundation Logo
city of raleigh logo